Monday, May 28, 2012

Chattanooga National Cemetery-Memorial Day 2012



By 1870, more than 12,800 interments were complete



Yesterday after bike ridding and enjoying some ice cream in the sun, I took my two youngest kids to the Chattanooga National Cemetery to reflect on the meaning of Memorial Day. It was late afternoon and the hallowed grounds were nearly empty except for a handful of visitors.  Boy Scouts had been out earlier planting an American flag at the headstones for each of the thousands of service men and women from America's conflicts--from the Revolutionary War to the present. There are vast rows of graves from the Civil War alone that cover hillsides. As we moved through the columns, I appreciated the solemnity that my children absorbed from this place and the sentiments I believe they will share with another generation. Our shared appreciation for those who serve and those who have served will guide their future.  

The Department of Veteran's Affairs has a historical description of the Chattanooga National Cemetery. Below it is posted in part.
  
"On Dec. 25, 1863, Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, “The Rock of Chickamauga," issued General Orders No. 296 creating a national cemetery in commemoration of the Battles of Chattanooga, Nov. 23-27, 1863. Gen. Thomas selected the cemetery site during the assault of his troops that carried Missionary Ridge and brought the campaign to an end. 

The site Thomas selected was approximately 75 acres of a round hill rising with a uniform slope to a height of 100 feet; it faced Missionary Ridge on one side and Lookout Mountain on the other. Gen. Grant established his headquarters on the summit of the hill during the early phase of the four-day battle for Lookout Mountain.

Chaplain Thomas B. Van Horne was placed in charge of the cemetery’s development. In a report of May 14, 1866, the chaplain indicated that one-third of the cemetery site could not be used for burials due to large rock outcroppings. As a result, he suggested a design dictated by the rocky terrain. Much was accomplished during Van Horne’s tenure at the cemetery. Flowering shrubs, evergreens and other trees were planted to replace a portion of the dense forest of oak trees that had been cut down as a part of the battleground. Each interment section consisted of a central site for a monument surrounded by plots for officers with the graves of enlisted personnel arranged in concentric circles around them. In 1867, it was designated Chattanooga National Cemetery.

Matthew Davis, 12,  visits Chattanooga National Cemetery
By 1870, more than 12,800 interments were complete: 8,685 known and 4,189 unknown. The dead included men who fell at the battles of Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain. There were also a number of reinterments from the surrounding area, including Athens, Charleston and locations along the line of Gen. Sherman’s march to Atlanta. A large number of men—1,798 remains—who died at the Battle of Chickamauga were relegated to unknowns during the reinterment process.

In addition to Civil War veterans, there are 78 German prisoners of war buried here. Pursuant to provisions included in the peace treaty between the United States and Germany at the end of World War I, the German government sought the location and status of the gravesites of Germans who died while detained in the United States. An investigation conducted by the War Department found that the largest number of German POWs was interred at Chattanooga National Cemetery. For a short time, thought was given to removing all other German interments to Chattanooga. In the end, however, the German government decided that only 23 remains from Hot Springs National Cemetery should be reinterred here. The German government assumed the cost of disinterment and transportation to Chattanooga, and erected a monument to commemorate the POWs."




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1 comment:

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